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  • Which lens for wildlife photography?

    Any suggestions on a good lens for landscape and wildlife photos? I have a 75-300mm but it is limited for long range photos. I want to be able to catch the shot of the grizzly lounging on the mountainside. I have a Digital Rebel XT.
    Thanks!
    Nashville
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  • #2
    A good website with a lot of "experts" and resources is DPREVIEW.

    I have a Canon 10D and use a EF 70-200 1:4 L USM for the wildlife and love the sharpness.. Of course this lens is somewhat slow.. If you can afford it go for the EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM.. This has a image stabilizer...and is quite heavy.(weight as well as $$$$).

    I use my tele with a monopod..This one I took in my backyard and he was about 300 yards away..

    The standard lens I use for landscape and general pictures is a EF 17-40mm 1:4 L USM..
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    Last edited by ZenfookPower; 12-28-2007, 09:23 PM. Reason: monopod and NOT mono pot..(stupid me)
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    • #3
      I use my tele with a mono pot..

      That's a great shot! What's a mono pot?? Is that something I can add to my 70/300 to get closer shots?
      Nashville
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      • #4
        First of all.. it is monopod.. I spelled it wrong..uch:

        Here is an example..it is just like a tripod but easier to carry on outdoor trips and walks in the woods....You can use a slower shutter speed and maintain some depth of field...and it is height adjustable.
        I have a Manfrotto 3245 with a 486RC2 compact ball head. You need to buy a plate that hooks up to the bottom of the camera (1/4-20 thread)
        If you use a heavy tele then you need to support the lens instead of the camera....
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        Last edited by ZenfookPower; 12-28-2007, 09:40 PM. Reason: added note
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        • #5
          When we were in Bosque Del Apache, NM, watching cranes and other birds some guy had a lense that looked like it weighed 10 lbs. I imagine he could zoom in on the bird's eye if he wanted to. I have a Cannon 28-105 for kicking around but I wish I had a better one.
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          • #6
            Patience and luck

            Originally posted by threeorfourtn View Post
            Any suggestions on a good lens for landscape and wildlife photos? I have a 75-300mm but it is limited for long range photos. I want to be able to catch the shot of the grizzly lounging on the mountainside. I have a Digital Rebel XT.
            Thanks!
            I have found that patience and luck are the best 'lens' to have. Patience in waiting for the right moment, and luck!
            1948 AIRSTREAM pulled with 1950 CHEVROLET 1 TON PANEL
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            • #7
              Talk about patience and luck.....while at the Bosque Del Apache impound we were watching a flock of snow geese in an impound of several acres, the entire impound was covered with geese, thousands of them. (Every morning and evening people flock to this area to see the lift offs and returns.) we were just watching the geese and something at the other end of the impound spooked them and all took off in a wave, it was the most awesome sight I have seen in a long time, literally covered ths sky overhead. The DW and I both stood there and watched each thinking the other had their camera going....wrong We finally realized that we did not get the picture of a lifetime and managed to get a few but not the great one we missed
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              • #8
                Originally posted by threeorfourtn View Post
                Any suggestions on a good lens for landscape and wildlife photos? I have a 75-300mm but it is limited for long range photos. I want to be able to catch the shot of the grizzly lounging on the mountainside. I have a Digital Rebel XT.
                Thanks!
                Just put on your sneakers and sneak up and take his picture. Then with the sneakers, you can run away. :nope:
                Going the extra mile just means you missed your exit.
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                • #9
                  Ok, pull up a chair, grab a cup of 'Jo and put your feet up....I' a gonna ramble.

                  First, I agree that DPreview.com has a ton of opinions, however, they do tend to flame you very fast there. I have quit posting there because of it. The reviews are good, though.

                  Now, for wildlife, buy the longest lens you can. The odds of being too far away are much greater than being too close. There are options, though, depending on budget.

                  Also, remember that the Rebel line has a 1.6 crop (I use 1.5 for easier math). What this means is that the chip in my 5D is full frame, or the same size as a 35mm frame of film. The 1.6 crop chips are roughly the same size as the old APS film, smaller than 35mm. The lens still fills a 35mm circle, but the chip isn't that big, so in theory, multiply your focal lengths by 1.5 (again, easier math). I have the 70-200 2.8 L IS on my 5D. I have several other "L" lenses, but this one is on my camera 90% of the time for portraits. I use the 100mm macro for all of my food photography. So, my 70-200 acts like a 70-200 on my 5D. If I were to put that on your Rebel, it would act like a 105mm-300mm. This is great if you want telephoto, which you do for wildlife. It stinks (A.K.A. Expensive) if you want wide angle. However, like I said, great for telephoto. You buy a 200mm and get a 300mm.


                  Canon 70-200 2.8L IS for $1,569

                  For me to get 300mm 2.8 on my 5D, I have to buy this:

                  Canon 300mm 2.8 for $3,899!!

                  Then you can add one of these teleconverters

                  You'll lose a touch of speed (drops it by 1-2 stops) and a touch of quality, but I'll give up the speed and quality as long as I get the shot. The are good quality teleconverters, though, so I mean a TOUCH of quality loss, nothing major.

                  I agree with the monopod, too. It really does help.

                  Oh, back to the lenses. Canon has 3 70-200 versions, and from my understanding, the sharpness goes, from best to "worst"

                  1) 70-200 2.8L IS
                  2) 70-200 F4.0L
                  3) 70-200 2.8L

                  I see they now have a 70-200 4.0L IS. I don't know anything about these, though, but I'm sure they're just as nice.

                  On Edit, after reviewing your initial post, the 70-200 would be a step backward in power from what you have. If I were you, I'd buy a 600mm. It's only $7200. Then, add the 2x Teleconverter. That would give you an effective 1800mm lens. That's how you shoot bears. From a Loooonnnnggg way away! :cheers:
                  Last edited by PhotoJoe; 12-30-2007, 11:39 PM.
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                  • #10
                    Sheesh!

                    Originally posted by PhotoJoe View Post

                    On Edit, after reviewing your initial post, the 70-200 would be a step backward in power from what you have. If I were you, I'd buy a 600mm. It's only $7200. Then, add the 2x Teleconverter. That would give you an effective 1800mm lens. That's how you shoot bears. From a Loooonnnnggg way away! :cheers:
                    That price nearly knocked my socks off! I was very glad that I was sitting while reading this post. Whatever happened to my little Brownie camera?
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                    • #11
                      Wow

                      Originally posted by wyalusingwillie View Post
                      That price nearly knocked my socks off! I was very glad that I was sitting while reading this post. Whatever happened to my little Brownie camera?
                      My old 125 Brownie never had a flash.
                      Lee
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                      • #12
                        Most wildlife photographers us anywhere from a 800mm to a 1500mm lens. Very expensive. I use a 17mm to 80mm or 70mm to 300mm zoom for landscape because each shot you take needs to be framed differently. The 1.6 magnification factor caused by the smaller than 35mm sensor makes these lens cover a range of about 28mm to 450 mm
                        Keeping one campground ahead of the Grimm Reaper, Patter :rofl::rofl:

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by wyalusingwillie View Post
                          That price nearly knocked my socks off! I was very glad that I was sitting while reading this post. Whatever happened to my little Brownie camera?
                          I had one of those once.......the bear ate it!

                          You don't have to be faster than the bear, though....just faster than the slowest person in your group......

                          Tom C.

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                          • #14
                            On monopoles/pods, I understand that some variations can also be used as a hiking stick.

                            Regards,
                            Tom C.

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                            • #15
                              A trick for improving steadyness on those long shots (everyone may already know this) is to use the short timer to take the shot instead using the normal release button. Of course your subject has to cooperate with the increase in time it takes to get the shot.

                              Regards,
                              Tom C.

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