Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

45th Infantry Division Museum

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 45th Infantry Division Museum

    Like the USS Batfish museum, the 45th Infantry Division Museum is another that waited a long time for my first visit while living in Oklahoma City. In spite of the fact that we moved there in 1988, it was June of 2013 before I finally got out there for my first visit. I've since visited it again on a couple of other occasions and plan to go again when we return to OKC for a visit with family next month. I will probably spend a few hours there, taking more pictures of the museum.

    If a person happens to be traveling through Oklahoma City and stays at the Twin Fountains RV Park on the northeast side of the city, one is within just 2 or 3 miles of the 45th Infantry Division Museum. (As a side note, it is also within a few miles of the Oklahoma City Zoo, the Science Museum Oklahoma, and the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, and Remington Park Racing and Casino.)

    The 45th Infantry museum has displays both outside and inside the building. The outside displays include all kinds of military vehicles and weapons. The inside has displays that cover the gamut between early American history, early Oklahoma history, and up more recent times, such as WWII and later military conflicts. The museum even has some unique displays of Nazi and Hitler artifacts.

    If one is a firearms enthusiast of any kind, weapons and copies of weapons exist at the museum ranging from at least the Revolutionary War up until present time. There are some very unique weapons among those on display. For instance, how many may have heard of a Colt Paterson revolving shotgun?

    The museum is free to enter, but there is the opportunity for one to donate to help defray costs at the museum. If one wants to take photographs within the museum building, they can be taken, but they do NOT allow the use of one's flash. So, if using a digital camera, own will either need to be on "auto ISO" or if without that, change the white balance of the camera for different situations. The displays in glass cases are under fluorescent lighting while those out of the cases are under incandescent lighting. So, if one can't set for "auto ISO," it requires changing back and forth on the white balance settings.

    I'll start with just a few photos and in later posts, hit some specific displays. First of all, below is a "shootin' arn," which is highlighted in a Bill Mauldin print. Bill Mauldin was an artist that was a correspondent in WWII for the Stars and Stripes newspaper (I think.) He was a favorite of the rank and file GI and a thorn in the side of the officers. If I remember right, General Eisenhower even had to specifically inform General Patton to leave Bill Mauldin alone. The museum also has something like 200 of Mauldin's prints on display.





    Older firearms:



    The long gun at the bottom of the next image is one of those Colt Paterson revolving shotguns.



    WWII era firearms:



    Here's one with an odd configuration.



    More to come....

    Terry
    Terry and Jo

    2010 Mobile Suites 38TKSB3
    2008 Ford F450
    2010 Ford F150 (Scout or Tag-a-long)

    Two minor works in progress....pictures taken over the years and a blog:

    Terry and Jo's Photobucket Account

    Ignoring the Barking Dogs

  • #2
    This next one is a 6 wheeled, articulated vehicle called the "Gama Goat." A friend at the state agency where I worked told me that they used to use the Gama Goat during the Vietnam War. Being six wheeled and amphibious, it was used to lay communication wire to different outposts from more central bases. He claimed that they required a lot of maintenance, and when they convoyed anywhere, the Gama Goats led the way. They did that because the Gama Goat was the slowest of the vehicles and by leading, they weren't left behind.





    The articulation point on the vehicle is between the rear section with just one axle and the front with two axles. There were no doors so that the vehicle could float. The wheels "drove" the Gama Goat on both land and in water. One can look on YouTube and find videos of Gama Goats in action. In water, they really aren't fast at all.



    Here are two more photos of displays inside the museum. These two are related to Oklahoma and its history.





    Terry
    Terry and Jo

    2010 Mobile Suites 38TKSB3
    2008 Ford F450
    2010 Ford F150 (Scout or Tag-a-long)

    Two minor works in progress....pictures taken over the years and a blog:

    Terry and Jo's Photobucket Account

    Ignoring the Barking Dogs

    Comment


    • #3
      One more entry for today. This is a huge artillery piece. There weren't many of them made, and I think for good reason. The last two pictures are of the transport vehicles needed to move this weapon. A truck with a crane was needed to dismantle the gun barrel from the "undercarriage" and the two separate pieces were then transported on the two different trailers.

      When I later went to the Fort Sill Artillery Museum, I took pictures of this weapon that were on the transport vehicles.





      These two images are of the "trailer" used to move the barrel for the gun.





      This last one was used for carrying the undercarriage, or base, for the barrel.



      These last two photos are "borrowed" from images taken at the Fort Sill Artillery Museum that show those two sections on their transport trailers. This first one is of the loaded "undercarriage."



      And now, the barrel on its carrier.



      I just have to wonder how long it took for the crews to assemble the gun for use and then to later dis-assemble it for transport.

      Terry
      Terry and Jo

      2010 Mobile Suites 38TKSB3
      2008 Ford F450
      2010 Ford F150 (Scout or Tag-a-long)

      Two minor works in progress....pictures taken over the years and a blog:

      Terry and Jo's Photobucket Account

      Ignoring the Barking Dogs

      Comment

      Working...
      X