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Which Steel is Best

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  • JEBar
    replied
    I do plan to keep the 5160 and will use it as a work knife .... it should make a good whittler .... the new 110 will be used only for food related cutting

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  • avvidclif
    replied
    I would contact Buck and express your dissatisfaction. You never know.

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  • JEBar
    replied
    ALMOST ONE YEAR LATER :

    as can be seen in the picture below, the tarnished 5160 blade grows darker and darker .... the 420 blade in the smaller Buck retains it shine .... the 5160 still performs as one should expect from a Buck 110 .... all that being said, I simply can't get used to working with a 110 with such a tarnished blade .... guess I've simply carried and used 420's for too many decades .... I'm not getting any younger and the 5160 shows no signs of wearing out any time soon .... consequently, I have a replacement 110 with a 420 steel blade on order .... should be here next week .... unless something totally unexpected happens, it should be the last one I need buy .... no clue what I'll do with the 5160 but it will most likely end up in a tool box where it can serve as needed

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  • JEBar
    replied
    Originally posted by JEBar View Post
    420HC Steel
    This is Buck's standard blade material because it approaches the wear resistance of high carbon alloys while delivering the corrosion resistance of chromium stainless steels. Add our exclusive heat-treat process and you have a very user-friendly combination of superior corrosion resistance with excellent strength for wear resistance and durability. You also have a blade that is easy to resharpen. For best performance we harden to a Rockwell hardness of Rc 58.

    5160 Steel
    Commonly known as spring steel, 5160 has excellent shock absorbing properties making it resilient to shattering and extremely durable as a knife steel. We harden to 57-58 Rc to maximize its performance.

    UPDATE

    I've now been using the Buck with the blade made from 5160 for just over 3 months .... while I like a good looking knife, my carry knives aren't for looks, they are work knives .... in the pictures below the tarnished 5160 blade in larger 110 Folding Hunter can be seen next to the 420 steel blade in the smaller Buck that I've carried for several years .... they both perform well but the 420 most certainly retains a better look .... I do plan to keep and use the 110 but I have no interest in buying another Buck with a 5160 steel blade

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  • eldermike
    replied
    1095 steel is old school carbon steel but it is common in straight razors because it can be sharpened beyond where most blade steels begin microscopic break off at the edge. Some steels can be frustrating because no matter how you try they will not get scary sharp. 1095 is used in wood plane blades and such. You have to oil it.

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  • avvidclif
    replied
    Doesn't take a genius to figure out which seems to work better. Thanks for trying it out and letting us know.

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  • JEBar
    replied
    I've been using the new Buck with 5160 BOS Carbon Steel for a couple of weeks .... per Buck :

    420HC Steel
    This is Buck's standard blade material because it approaches the wear resistance of high carbon alloys while delivering the corrosion resistance of chromium stainless steels. Add our exclusive heat-treat process and you have a very user-friendly combination of superior corrosion resistance with excellent strength for wear resistance and durability. You also have a blade that is easy to resharpen. For best performance we harden to a Rockwell hardness of Rc 58.

    5160 Steel
    Commonly known as spring steel, 5160 has excellent shock absorbing properties making it resilient to shattering and extremely durable as a knife steel. We harden to 57-58 Rc to maximize its performance.

    I have noticed a few things :

    1... I can't tell any difference in sharpness, edge retention, or sharpening

    2... I can't tell any difference in performance

    3... the only difference I can tell is the 5160 tarnishes quickly where the 420 retains its new shiny finish


    bottom line :

    based on owning 2 420's and now having a 5160, if I ever order anther, I'll go back with the 420

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  • JEBar
    replied
    new 110 arrived a few minutes ago .... not bad, ordered Friday afternoon, delivered Sunday morning .... in the pictures below, its pretty easy to tell the new from the old .... any apparent difference is size is some sort of optical illusion .... the blade of the old one is slightly smaller from having been sharpened .... about the only difference I can tell in the sheaths is the stamp .... in all other regards the appear identical .... the knife is clearly stamped made in the USA, a tag on the sheath indicates it was made in Mexico .... the new one will be up to use for the first time tonight, it will be used to get some SD steaks ready for the grill

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  • staggerlee
    replied
    Yes they have a time limit though.
    I find it very interesting to watch how it was done like the old smithy's.
    I can almost smell the coal burning.

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  • JEBar
    replied
    Originally posted by staggerlee View Post
    I would go with very high carbon steel personally.
    Its just hard to get any longer.

    ever watch Forged In Fire on the History Channel ....https://www.myrvtalk.com/forum/rv-li...forged-in-fire.... I really enjoy watching them custom make blades of all types

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  • JEBar
    replied
    interesting link .... thanks for posting it .... based on reading the links in this thread, I believe my other 110's were made 420HC so I decided to give their 5160 BOS Carbon Steel a try .... it should be here tomorrow .... looking forward to seeing if I can tell any difference

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  • staggerlee
    replied
    I would go with very high carbon steel personally.
    Its just hard to get any longer.
    Here is a list of a few.


    http://americansworking.com/listing-category/knives/
    No Jap crap here.

    Leave a comment:


  • JEBar
    replied
    interesting knives, enjoyed looking at them .... I doubt that anyone will be surprised at the pocketknife I carry .... its a 40+ year old, Old Timer .... not fancy to be sure .... for me its comfortable

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  • bobbidonb
    replied
    I knew the manbug was not for you, but since you probably carry your Buck on your belt this Chris Reeve Nayala might interest you. It would trim up those South Dakota steaks with ease.
    Nyala: A Modern Take on a Classic Skinner

    Leave a comment:


  • JEBar
    replied
    interesting knife .... I'd seen them but know little to nothing about them .... historically, for me, a Buck 110 was a working knife that was also used processing game .... I literally used and sharpened the first one so often that Buck replaced the blade .... back when we ran a catering business where we cooked whole hogs, my 110 was a most valuable asset .... in recent years I use it heavily when grilling both at home and on the road .... its certainly not a pocket knife, it is a good fit for what I need

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